Christian Sermons are the New Hate Speech!

The “Bathroom Bill”

One October 17th, 2014, U.S. Senator Ted Cruz, R-Texas, stood in defense of Houston pastors’ First Amendment right to preach and speak from the pulpit freely.  The controversy has been nicknamed “the bathroom bill”   Thanks to our Bill of Rights, The City of Houston has backed off, a little bit at least. Let’s review the event and analyze how and why the Constitution once  again is at least almost doing its job as designed.

Senator Cruz’s speech concerned a shockingly unconstitutional attempt by the City of Houston to restrict Houstonians’ practice of religion and free speech, in favor of furthering a pro-gay political agenda backed by the city government.

In the video linked below, Senator Cruz called upon the pastors and citizens of Houston to defy the City of Houston’s recent unjust sermon subpoena requirement.

That’s right, you read it correctly; a city requirement to examine and approve the contents — of Christian sermons!

Listen to exactly what Senator Cruz had to say about the matter here,  courtesy of  The Liberty Foundation

Outrage is Due!

This action taken by the City of Houston should seem  outrageous to  every American, but what is frightening is that this unjust policy  garnered  any support from the public at all.  Gay and transgender supporters feel especially offended  by traditional Christians who disagree with their version of morality.

No Political Bias Here

I’m not here to defend or to oppose the morality held by the offended party, namely, the LGBT crowd.  I’m only here to defend every  citizen’s inalienable right to hold and to speak his own religious opinion freely.  Period.

Who Grants Human Authority?

Who granted the City of Houston the authority to pass judgment upon the truth of any human opinion?  Who granted The City of Houston the authority to exercise an assumption that their morality trumps all other versions of morality?  Nobody grants such authority, and that logically renders such supposed authority invalid.

Any humanly supposed authority is self granted. It has no real authority, except that imagined by those who claim it. Such a false supposition of authority rings of tyranny.

The First and Tenth Amendments

We’re all familiar with the First Amendment’s assurance of free speech and  of free religious practice, but what about the Tenth Amendment?

In a nutshell, the Tenth Amendment states that all clauses distinctly defined in the Bill of Rights are valid and enforceable at every level of government within the United States, including, but not limited to the level of state and city governments.

That means that the First Amendment always trumps local laws and rulings.  The right to practice free speech of any nature is universal and inalienable, and that is why it was spelled out in the Bill of Rights – because that is what the Bill of Rights is, namely, an enumeration of inalienable rights..

The Right to Live Your Own Belief System is also Universal

I can really sympathize with the LGBT point of view, but I cannot at all sympathize with their unconstitutional methods of flexing political power.

The right to your own belief system is yours,  and the right to speak freely about that belief system is yours  – whatever it might be.   So, let’s look at both sides of the coin.

If you are LGBT or an LGBT sympathizer, you have the right to be what you are, and you have the right to openly disagree with those who oppose your choices.  That is, in traditional Christian terms, free will.  If you are an atheist,  it’s a sure bet you will still agree that you possess an inherent right to choose for yourself.

Likewise, if you are the member of a Christian congregation, or the pastor over such a congregation, you also have the right to be what you are, and you have the right to openly disagree with those who oppose your choices.  It’s as simple as that!

LGBTs, like anyone else, don’t like being criticized for their choices, and neither do Christians.  Yet, Christian pastors do not disagree with the individual right for any individual to choose to be LGBT.  Once again, that’s called free will in religious circles.  It’s widely accepted in traditional Christianity that God granted us free will,  the option of making a mistake that can be corrected.  What  Christians preach about is what they see as the dangers of your making the wrong  choice, and of course they hope to talk you out of doing what they feel might be bad for you.

Yes, certain churches do condemn the practice of homosexuality, and they do openly preach against it, and  they do warn of what they believe to be the dangers of that style of life.  On the flip side, pro-gay groups are often quite active in openly bashing traditional Christianity.

Do not pastors, as Americans, have as much right to condemns LGBTs , as LGBTs have a right to openly preach against and condemn Christians?  Pro-gay groups do commonly openly bash traditional Christianity, yet traditional Christians generally do not call for the silencing of the opinions of the LGBT crowd.  Why the hypocrisy?

 The New Hate Speech

Why is a traditional pastor’s version of the truth painted as hateful, while the derision of Christians on the part of those who oppose traditional moral Christianity, the LGBT version of truth,  is painted as a fair and balanced view?

Why do we consistently see one sided behavior from human government that would silence traditional Christian opinion, and would herald their own humanist opinion as the superior one?  If Christians were really mistaken, and the real God is not divine, but instead humanism really rules us all, then there would be no real authority outside of humanism!

Who, then, in a supposed humanist world, would decide which of the two humanist views was superior?

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